These countries include Albania, Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Germany, Greece, Honduras, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Kazakhstan, Mauritius, Mexico, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, and Venezuela. It’s important to remember that if you have been asked to get an Apostille for your Canadian document by someone in one of these countries the two steps of authentication and legalization must be completed in order for it to be accepted as the equivalent to an Apostille.

Since Canada has not signed the Hague Apostille Convention it uses the original process to validate documents for international use called authentication and legalization. Although the Government of Canada has not signed the convention it is currently studying the idea. Responding to a recent Hague Conference questionnaire that it has no projected timeline for an outcome on the study of implementing this new process in Canada. In 2015 Authentication Legalization Services Canada was contacted by Global Affairs Canada about our opinion on the idea of joining the convention. Having experience of working with both the Apostille process and the current authentication legalization method in Canada, we were happy to provide what we saw as the pros and cons of both.